Upcoming Movies

This is a list of suggested movies. If you want to suggest a movie – scroll down!

Appalachia: Rich Land, Poor People – 60 mins.

The land is rich with coal, yet its residents are denied adequate food, housing, or medical care. This, the Appalachian region, was the nation’s first designated poverty area. This film focuses upon Eastern Kentucky where mechanization of the mines is replacing people and jobs. A lack of education and other working skills makes these residents prisoners of the land, as seen by a discerning interview with a local family. Filmed in 1968.

HyperNormalization – 3 part series (3 hour long documentary)

“HyperNormalisation” spends nearly three hours telling us how we got to such a troubling moment in world history. From Donald Trump’s emergence as a celebrity business tycoon (despite his inability to keep his casinos afloat) to the Reagan Administration’s invention of Muammar Qaddafi as a global supervillain in order to avoid confrontation with a newly radicalized Syria, the film finds moment after moment where lies have become codified and accepted, where Western leaders have refused hard choices, ceded authority to global finance, and built simplistic, patently false narratives to steer the public away from the uncertainty and ambivalence of our times. That most of us have accepted these tall tales has had, according to Curtis, unintended and often terrifying consequences.

Angela Davis: Radical Frameworks for Social Justice – 60 mins.

Long time political activist and academic Angela Davis talks about social justice movements. Distinguishing between race/gender diversity and a broader concept of human rights she nurtures a more vibrant and sustainable dialog.

Naomi Klein – The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism – 50 mins.

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author of the New York Times and #1 international bestseller, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. This is a lecture she gave in Boulder, Colorado on December 8, 2007, where she explodes the myth that the global free market triumphed democratically. Exposing the thinking, the money trail and the puppet strings behind the world-changing crises and wars of the last four decades, and how America’s “free market” policies have come to dominate the world– through the exploitation of disaster-shocked people and countries.

Stokely Carmichael – 45 mins.

Stokely Carmichael also known as Kwame Touré was a Trinidadian-American political activist best known for leading the civil rights group SNCC in the 1960s, and later, the global Pan-African movement. Growing up in the United States from the age of eleven, he graduated from Howard University. He rose to prominence in the civil rights and Black Power movements, first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), later as the “Honorary Prime Minister” of the Black Panther Party, and finally as a leader of the All-African Peoples Revolutionary Party.

The Old Corruption (Britain’s Slave Trade Documentary) – 50 mins.

The Old Corruption challenges the accepted version of the history of abolition, that the passive, suffering slaves were freed by benevolent white crusaders, revealing the corruption of the plantations owners, and how the inhuman treatment of African people was finally acknowledged. This is the untold story of the greatest slaving nation in history. Up till now, Britain’s place in the history of slavery has been as the country that abolished the international slave trade. Britain’s Slave Trade reveals the shameful truth behind this liberal facade, showing how the economic, social and cultural life of Britain would have been unrecognisable without slavery. Britain’s Slave Trade explains how a middling European power transformed itself into the ruler of the waves, tracing the impact this had on the British way of life and taking in the Industrial Revolution, the beginnings of Empire and the birth of modern racism along the way. It also unearths startling evidence showing how many families that think of themselves as ‘pure’ English stock are in fact descended from slave ancestors.